Situation Abnormal

Not an excuse, but I can't deny that the current American political shit-scape has affected my writing. 

Creative acts haven't seemed as important as remaining vigilant and active to the many ways that the current presidential administration is trying to screw over the American people.

(I know this is wrong...not about the crass and openly opportunistic actions of the Trump administration and its salivating and obedient GOP lapdogs, but about creative acts. We must continue our artistic endeavors especially in times such as these.) 

This is not a political blog; however, I acknowledge that the personal is political, and when the political becomes personal, writing has often lost out on my priority list. 

So, like the rest of us, I'm doing my best. I wish I had more faith in American politics to correct itself, but the GOP is hopelessly lost, and the Democrats can't seem to organize or codify an effective strategy.

Partisan politics won't save us.

We have to push from the bottom up. We have to get out from behind our screens and engage each other. That takes time, and it takes energy, and it's the only way to fix this mess.

Thus I turn again to writing and the minutiae of my own life. Maybe I can finally complete a project.

Yesterday in Charlottesville....

There is much to react to, much to be shocked by—much to be enraged by—so it’s difficult to know where to start.

The 'Unite the Right' protest was a glaringly public display of American racism’s ‘all-clear’ to crawl out of the shadows and dance in the daylight. These men and women brandishing their swastikas and their confederate flags and their message t-shirts sense that in a country that has voted Donald Trump into the highest office, their hatred is free—is welcome—to display for all to celebrate.

The president—a uniquely un-qualified non-politician who embodies the words ‘epic and embarrassing failure’ more than any president in the history of the office; a man who just two days before was taunting North Korea with rage and nuclear fire because that’s how temper-tantrum prone man-babies behave when they have no other skill-set—drew a false equivalence between the 'Unite the Right' demonstrators and the counter-protestors as if racial hatred and the reaction to that hatred are the same.

They are not.

Those marching in support of 'Unite the Right' are driven by a loathing (and by extension fear) for whatever and whomever is not them. It’s prejudice that was long-ago sewn into the fabric of American society, into our institutions, and into our individual lives. It’s racism that we’ve all learned and had modeled for us, it’s hatred that we ourselves have given voice to and have spread.

Our job—collectively and individually—is to acknowledge that this gut-level acrimony is wrong. It is evil. It is a response and way of being that one should in fact be ashamed of. Racism is a base human reaction that we must work on in ourselves and within the broader social fabric. Giving into it—celebrating it, killing in the name of it—denies our ability to grow and to evolve. It holds on to a retrograde way of being ‘white and right’ that is dead. Gone. The ghosts have not yet given up the body. But they will.

The ideas, theories, emotions expressed by those marching on behalf of the 'Unite the Right' are not of equal weight and value as those who counter-protested. A president worth anything would have seen and acknowledged this, but we don’t have that kind of president.

We have Donald Trump. And we live in his America now.

Suffering Suffrage

I don’t seek them out, per se, but when I encounter Trump Supporter ‘outrage’ over the investigation into the Trump’s administration conduct during the 2016 presidential election, what I hear is fear.

Fear that the obvious question before American citizens will be raised: Did Russia’s interference extend to the 2016 vote counts themselves, ultimately altering or negating votes intended for Clinton?

Once we ask that question, once we raise the possibility that our supposed democratic process is compromised, how do we shore up the flaws in the technology in order to re-gain trust in the results of future elections?

(I’m setting aside the just as consequential detriments to voting rights -- gerrymandering and voter suppression -- only because they are each topics too large for this post. And frankly, I can only take on so many depressing topics in one morning.)

Although I work with cyber-security experts, I am not one myself, and I don’t claim to have access to classified intel about how far the Russians penetrated our voting system. I am, however, a US citizen who thinks it’s time to tolerate the inevitable discomfort around this topic and address the concern directly.

Regardless of your political affiliation, regardless of where you stand with the current presidential administration, we can (and should) all agree that the sanctity of the American voting system is paramount.

Several recent articles and podcasts of late have shown just how vulnerable the technology supporting the American voting system is.

 

Despicable T – The Political Has Become the Personal

Mine was never intended to be a political blog, but I can’t remain silent in these weeks since Donald Trump was inaugurated.

I have disagreed with both Republican and Democratic presidents before, but I have never felt compelled to push back so hard and so forcefully against an administration. Trump’s strategy and tactics are obvious – his administration intends to overwhelm and to bully while piecing out little nuggets to the GOP in order to keep Republicans mollified against the more egregious and unconstitutional of Executive Orders (see the Muslim Ban).

As for the Democrats, the Trump administration simply wants to mow them over and expose at every turn how powerless they are.

It may be too early to know if these tactics (often attributed by the press as those of Steve Bannon’s) are working; much of this will depend on the how the GOP ultimately responds because, let’s face it, the Democrats have very few plays until 2018.

One would think that the GOP would stand up against Trump’s authoritarian rhetoric, his flirtations with fascism, but either out of fear or because Republicans are making some gains (de-regulation of environmental measures, Neal Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination), they are either silent or quietly supportive of Trump’s actions.

This is a travesty. The GOP is being played, and the country is suffering.

The President of the United States is not a king. He is an elected official. And two weeks into his presidency, Trump has already revealed himself to be a deeply flawed official at that. The Trump Administration needs to be put in check.

Right now, that falls to us, the citizens. Both Democrats and Republicans. The judicial branch is rousing, some members of congress and the Senate are beginning to speak out, but they’re doing so slowly. In some cases, too slowly.

In the meantime, there is us. I won’t remain silent and neither should you. To coin a favorite Trump word against him, his presidency is a disaster. Whether that disaster limits itself only to his political career or it takes down the entire country is ultimately up to all of us.